NetGuard by MobileGuard-A Network-based Mobile Compliance Solution

MobileGuard, a pioneer in mobile archiving and compliance, has expanded its compliance solution capabilities. NetGuard uniquely enables text message archiving on iPhones, Android, Blackberry and Windows devices without the need for any app or virtual number, making NetGuard a one of a kind archiving system. Additionally, NetGuard provides seamless integration with your MDM solution to create a unified mobile compliance solution.

NetGuard, integrates at the wireless carrier tier, allowing enterprises to deploy iPhones, among other devices capable of sending and receiving text messages. Once devices are provisioned, each user leverages the native text messaging apps on those devices and the SMS and MMS messages are archived. The solution is a comprehensive compliance solution for Government, Financial Services and Enterprise that provides unified, device independent, real-time monitoring, alerts, capture, archival and analysis for any mobile device.

Patented Archiving Solution
– Capture SMS and MMS messages on iPhones and other mobile devices
– No app install is required

– Easy provisioning via text message

– Conversation threading available

– Cloud-hosted and on premise deployment options available

– Compliant offering for financial and government sectors– Capture SMS and MMS

“Closed-System Architecture“ Solution
NetGuard provides users a solution to archiving SMS and MMS messages sent and received from devices operating with a Closed-System Architecture”. NetGuard is the only solution on the market with the ability to capture messages from Apple’s “Closed-System Architecture” operating system (iOS). Similarly, NetGuard can capture messages from Windows operating system. MobileGuard’s patented IP and global partnerships help provide the NetGuard service for iPhone and other devices giving clients a complete solution for monitoring, capturing and supervising text messages. SMS and MMS messages are identified, collected, and archived in a format that is easily accessible, allowing companies to establish meaningful internal compliance policies. MobileGuard’s NetGuard solution ensures all mobile devices meet compliance mandates from relevant regulatory bodies using a universal platform that works with all of your companies Android, iOS, Blackberry and Windows mobile devices.

Cloud Based or On-Premises Storage
Whether using company-owned or BYOD, the MobileGuard team of development engineers will lead your company through specific requirements, customizations and implementations to give your organization a robust and complete mobile compliance solution within days. MobileGuard’s mobile electronic communication compliance solutions are provided as “On-Premises” or cloud solution depending on the size of the population.

For added security, MobileGuard offers an On-Premises solution where archived messages are sent from the carrier level directly to a companies on-sight servers providing additional safeguards for data and privacy protection. Many large organizations (over 200 devices) in the financial services industry and in government have opted to use this technology for additional mobile security.

What You Don’t Know About Mobile Hacking

Whatever programmed thoughts you have about your phone being safe as long as it stays in your pocket—erase them now. The truth is: it is relatively easy to hack into a phone, even if it is smart.

Today, phones aren’t just devices we use to place calls. We use them to transfer money from one bank account to another. We store passwords and personal information on them. We video chat, instant message, play games and more. We are always more attached to our phones than we think. Ever caught that nosy guy sitting next to you on the train catching a not-so-sneaky glimpse of what you were texting, reading or playing on your phone? You were really annoyed, (weren’t you?) even though chances are he had no idea of what you were actually doing.

Because phones are evolving to smartphones and able to do incredible things they weren’t able to before, we are depending on them more than ever. Of course, hackers know this. One easy way to hack into a phone involves only the art of deceit and nothing more. “For instance, a would-be hacker might call you and pose as the phone company saying they need to update your account and need your password. Or the hacker might get enough of your information to call the phone company and pose as you,” says Robert Siciliano, a McAfee consultant and identity theft expert.

In the case that you do get this type of call, remember that your mobile carrier will never call you to ask for a password, even if they are doing an “update.” The general rule you should follow is to never give out passwords or personal information via phone, unless you have actually called first to ask for an update of some sort.

Hackers also know that many carriers still use default passwords for the phones they issue and a good number of people just don’t know to change them. This makes their job super easy—they can simply look up default passwords provided by carriers and use them to their advantage.

The best precaution you can take is to change your password occasionally.

In the widely known News Corp. scandal, “the now-closed News of the World paid bribes to police and intercepted the voice mails of celebrities, politicians and crime victims.” (Aug16th, WSJ) It is extremely likely that these phone hacks intro voicemails involved easy access to default passwords of victims who hadn’t changed them on their phones.

More technically adept hackers may “get a bit of information about your account and send a phishing email purportedly from your carrier asking you to log in. At that point they will have your password and other sensitive information.”

Because smartphones allow applications to be run on them, hackers can easily attach malicious codes to these applications that are downloaded on a daily basis. The “safe-in-my-pocket” thoughts should disappear—your phone doesn’t even need to be seen to be hacked. Be cautious of the applications you download, especially if you’re an Android user. Publishers are allowed to download their applications right into the Android market, so be careful.

The bottom line is: Be cautious about the activity you conduct on your phone. Fewer purchases via a website from your mobile device, fewer risky downloads and more password changes today may mean fewer headaches tomorrow.

 

Source: http://technewscast.com/technology/tech-buzz/mobile-hacking-how-safe-is-your-smartphone/

Text Messages Provide a Wealth of Documentation for Litigators

Unlike emails, text messages have a limited lifespan, in that they cease to exist after a period of time.  Since the use of text messaging is increasing, it is inevitable that there will be an increase in lawsuits involving text messages.  In the financial services sector, text messages are seen as a form of electronic communication and need to be treated like emails with regard to the preservation, review, and approval of messages.  It is only a matter of time before all industries are held to this high of a standard.

According to Winchester and Maines writing for The New York Law Journal, “…the party who fails to take appropriate steps to preserve text data and content may face sanctions of spoliation if it can be shown that this information should have been considered reasonably likely to be important at the time it existed.”[i] The strategy of senior executives should be that of preserving corporate profits by mitigating the amount of exposure they have with regard to text messaging.

As citizens we have the right to review what our elected officials are discussing via emails.  However, government officials have been able to skirt the public disclosure laws by conducting communications through text messaging.  According to a reporter, Erica Barnett, she was unable to obtain the text messages for a Seattle City Council member even though the text messages are subject to the same disclosure laws as emails.[ii] Corporations are responsible for ensuring that all electronic communication can be made readily available to regulators, so why shouldn’t our elected officials be held to such high standards?

In 2010, after inquiries made by taxpayers and the media, some senior city officials and five City Council Members of Bell, CA were involved in a pervasive scandal that swindled millions from the tax payers of Bell.  These individuals were paying themselves high salaries and embezzling city funds and they currently face criminal charges.  As a result, the state of California wants to put the city in receivership, but the city cannot come to agreement with the state.  The State Deputy Attorney General, Jim Hines, stated, “Our main goal has been to ensure accountability and transparency in city management until new elections can be held and to do so without imposing high costs…”[iii] If municipalities were required to have a text messaging compliance software package, our elected officials might think twice before conducting fraudulent activities.

Mobile compliance solutions such as TextGuard’s SMS mobile compliance software allow for the collection and filtering of messages in a compliant manner.  This ensures elected officials are held to a high standard where accountability and transparency exists and empowers the everyday citizen to make sure their elected officials act accordingly.  It also allows for prosecutors to obtain evidence of any inappropriate, illegal, or unethical behavior.

[i] New York Law Journal, Harvesting Evidence From the Sea of Text Messages, Alan M. Winchester and Russell E. Maines, October 06, 2010

[ii] Publicola, Council Members’ Text Messages Not Subject to Public Disclosure, Erica C. Barnett, Tuesday, February 23, 2010

[iii] Los Angeles Times, Legal fight looms over control of Bell, Jeff Gottlieb and Ruben Vives, October 14, 2010

 

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